How to hide and show or toggle the default value of input fields using Jquery

Guys jQuery is awesome library for client end works.
This simple script is allows to hide and show or toggle the default value of input fields.
I used this for my some of the works it is so useful.

Try it..!!!

<!DOCTYPE html5>
<head>
<title>Jquery Togle text in text box</title>
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.7.2/jquery.min.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">
$(document).ready(function() {
var originalValues = new Array();
$("input").focus(function() {
if (!originalValues[this.id]) {
originalValues[this.id] = $(this).val()
}
if ( $(this).val()==originalValues[this.id]) {
$(this).val('');
}
});
$("input").blur(function() {
if ( $(this).attr("value")=="") {
$(this).val(originalValues[this.id]);
}
});
});
</script>
</head>
<body>
<input name="" type="text" value="Change me.!">
</body>
</html>

Happy Coding
Cheers

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Posted in Jquery | Leave a comment

CSS Hacks collections for Chrome ,Safari Firefox, Opera, Konqueror,Gecko,IE

Web UI is one of the most important sections in web developing industry. UI ( User Interface) is the final result of any Software program. so UI Engineers have a big work to do, because final result page is on their hand.

In web industry we are developing a web site, but our web application not interest for users because UI is not in quality state. web industry we make web pages for display final result, and that result rendered by WEB BROWSERS. there are number of web browsers available in today world and those are have unique mechanism to renders or read HTML.

Mozilla, IE , Chorome , Safary, Opera those are leading web browsers in today. Today I am going to introduce how to hack css rules for Chrome ,Safari Firefox, Opera, Konqueror,Gecko,IE

 

Modern browsers only (not IE 7)

    html>/**/body .myClass {
...
}

Gecko only

  .myClass:not([attr*=""]) {
...
}

Safari 3.0 and Chrome only

 @media screen and (-webkit-min-device-pixel-ratio:0) {
.myClass {
....
}
}

Firefox & IE 7, and newer

  html>body .myClass {
...
}

Chrome browser

   body:nth-of-type(1) .myClass {
...
}

Safari only

    .myClass:not(:root:root) {
...
}

Safari 3.0 and Chrome only

   @media screen and (-webkit-min-device-pixel-ratio:0) {
.myClass {
....
}
}

Safari browser css hack

  body:first-of-type .myClass {property:value;}

Firefox, Opera, Konqueror, Safari

*|html .myClass {
...
}

Safari

@media screen and (-webkit-min-device-pixel-ratio:0)
{
#safari { display: block; }
}
Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment

Be a rounded man with CSS3

I hate Micro $oft because I hate $….haaa haaa..!!!! :D :D :D

any how this my post suit for designers but also it is perfect for designers specially CMS themers.

Now a days we are messing with HTML5 and CSS3 standards. but Unfortunately some awesome css rules are not compatible with IE.

ex : rounded corners. this style is not working for IE for that you can use Jquery. remember Java script is rocky language.

Jquery has awesome pluging called jQuery corners

http://malsup.github.com/jquery.corner.js

simply you can use this library.

lets go to make it…..

<html>
<head>
<script src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.4.2/jquery.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
<script src="http://malsup.github.com/jquery.corner.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
<script>
$('.this-is-round').corner("round 6px");
</script>
</head>
<body>
<div>
<h1>How is this..!!!</h1>
</div>
</body>
</html>
check it..!!!
do it..!!!
and
ROCK IT..!!!!
Posted in css / css3 trick | Leave a comment

How Restore preferences in Dreamweaver CS4, CS5, CS5.5, CS6

Last couple of days I had a issue with my Adobe Dreamwever. I did not get the code hint. In DW it is handling on preferences ( Edit -> preferences ). I tried and tried and tried. All the time I field. But I found a solution for restore DW setting back. here it is.

Damaged preferences files can cause crashes, errors, and other unexpected behavior in Dreamweaver. Follow the instructions below to restore preferences to the default settings.
Some of the procedure below require you to access hidden folders. By default, Windows does not display hidden folders or files.

Some of these procedures involve editing the Windows registry. in this tutorial doesn’t provide support for editing the registry, which contains critical system and application information. Make sure to back up the registry before editing it. For more information about the registry, see the Windows documentation or contact Microsoft.

Remove preferences on Windows 7 or Windows Vista

Exit Dreamweaver.
In Windows Explorer, navigate to C:\Users\Your User Name\AppData\Roaming\Adobe.

Rename the Dreamweaver preferences folder:

Dreamweaver CS6: Rename the Dreamweaver CS6 folder to,

for example, Old Dreamweaver CS6.

Dreamweaver CS5.5: Rename the Dreamweaver CS5.5 folder to,

for example, Old Dreamweaver CS5.5.

Dreamweaver CS5: Rename the Dreamweaver CS5 folder to,

for example, Old Dreamweaver CS5.

Dreamweaver CS4: Rename the Dreamweaver CS4 folder to,

for example, Old Dreamweaver CS4.

Choose Start, type regedit in the Start Search, and then press Enter.

In the left pane of the Registry Editor, navigate to the following key:

HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Adobe

Remove the Dreamweaver preferences registry entries.

Dreamweaver CS6
Select the Dreamweaver CS6 key, then select File > Export. In the Export Registry File dialog, enter a filename and location, and then click Save.
Ensure the Dreamweaver CS6 key is still selected, and then select Edit > Delete. In the Confirm Key Delete dialog, click Yes.

Dreamweaver CS5.5
Select the Dreamweaver CS5.5 key, then select File > Export. In the Export Registry File dialog, enter a filename and location, and then click Save.
Ensure the Dreamweaver CS5.5 key is still selected, and then select Edit > Delete. In the Confirm Key Delete dialog, click Yes.

Dreamweaver CS5
Select the Dreamweaver CS5 key, then select File > Export. In the Export Registry File dialog, enter a filename and location, and then click Save.
Ensure the Dreamweaver CS5 key is still selected, and then select Edit > Delete. In the Confirm Key Delete dialog, click Yes.

Dreamweaver CS4
Select the Dreamweaver CS4 key, then select File > Export. In the Export Registry File dialog, enter a filename and location, and then click Save.
Ensure the Dreamweaver CS4 key is still selected, and then select Edit > Delete. In the Confirm Key Delete dialog, click Yes.
Exit the Registry Editor.

Remove preferences on Windows XP

Exit Dreamweaver.
In Windows Explorer, navigate to C:\Documents and Settings\Your User Name\Application Data\Adobe.

Rename the Dreamweaver preferences folder:

Dreamweaver CS6: Rename the Dreamweaver CS6 folder to,

for example, Old Dreamweaver CS6.

Dreamweaver CS5.5: Rename the Dreamweaver CS5.5 folder to,

for example, Old Dreamweaver CS5.5.

Dreamweaver CS5: Rename the Dreamweaver CS5 folder to,

for example, Old Dreamweaver CS5.

Dreamweaver CS4: Rename the Dreamweaver CS4 folder to,

for example, Old Dreamweaver CS4.

Choose Start > Run. Type regedit in the Open textbox, and then press Enter or click OK.

In the left pane of the Registry Editor, navigate to the following key:

HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Adobe

Remove the Dreamweaver preferences registry entries:

Dreamweaver CS6
Select the Dreamweaver CS6 key, then select File > Export. In the Export Registry File dialog, enter a filename and location, and then click Save.
Ensure the Dreamweaver CS6 key is still selected, and then select Edit > Delete. In the Confirm Key Delete dialog, click Yes.

Dreamweaver CS5.5

Select the Dreamweaver CS5.5 key, then select File > Export. In the Export Registry File dialog, enter a filename and location, and then click Save.
Ensure the Dreamweaver CS5.5 key is still selected, and then select Edit > Delete. In the Confirm Key Delete dialog, click Yes.

Dreamweaver CS5

Select the Dreamweaver CS5 key, then select File > Export. In the Export Registry File dialog, enter a filename and location, and then click Save.
Ensure the Dreamweaver CS5 key is still selected, and then select Edit > Delete. In the Confirm Key Delete dialog, click Yes.

Dreamweaver CS4

Select the Dreamweaver CS4 key, then select File > Export. In the Export Registry File dialog, enter a filename and location, and then click Save.
Ensure the Dreamweaver CS4 key is still selected, and then select Edit > Delete. In the Confirm Key Delete dialog, click Yes.
Exit the Registry Editor.

Posted in IDE Tip | 3 Comments

Steven Paul Jobs Stay Hungry , Stay Foolish…!

Steven Paul Jobs

Shoulder-high portrait of smiling man in his fifties wearing a black turtle neck shirt with a day-old beard holding a phone facing the viewer in his left hand
Jobs holding a white iPhone 4 at Worldwide Developers Conference 2010

Born Steven Paul Jobs
February 24, 1955(1955-02-24)
San Francisco, California, U.S.
Died October 5, 2011(2011-10-05) (aged 56)
Palo Alto, California, U.S.
Cause of death Respiratory arrest/pancreatic cancer[3]
Nationality American
Alma mater Reed College (one semester)
Occupation Co-founder, Chairman and CEO, Apple Inc., CEO, Pixar,
Years active 1974–2011
Net worth increase$7.0 billion (September 2011)
Board member of The Walt Disney Company,[5] Apple Inc.
Religion Buddhism
Spouse Laurene Powell
(1991–2011, his death)
Children 4
Relatives Mona Simpson (sister)

Stay Hungry , Stay Foolish…! address delivered by Steve Jobs in 2005 at Stanford University.Steve Jobs is one of the iconic personality in IT world. He made legendary history with his tremendous inventions.

Jobs, whose deathat the age of 56 was announced Wednesday night October 5 2011, started that speech by telling about being adopted as a baby, and why, 17 years later, he attended Reed College in Oregon for only six months before dropping out.

“My biological mother was a young, unwed college graduate student, and she decided to put me up for adoption. She felt very strongly that I should be adopted by college graduates, so everything was all set for me to be adopted at birth by a lawyer and his wife. Except that when I popped out they decided at the last minute that they really wanted a girl. So my parents, who were on a waiting list, got a call in the middle of the night asking: ‘We have an unexpected baby boy; do you want him?’ They said: ‘Of course.’

“My biological mother later found out that my mother had never graduated from college and that my father had never graduated from high school. She refused to sign the final adoption papers. She only relented a few months later when my parents promised that I would someday go to college.

“And 17 years later I did go to college.

“But I naively chose a college that was almost as expensive as Stanford, and all of my working-class parents’ savings were being spent on my college tuition. After six months, I couldn’t see the value in it. I had no idea what I wanted to do with my life and no idea how college was going to help me figure it out. And here I was spending all of the money my parents had saved their entire life. So I decided to drop out and trust that it would all work out OK. It was pretty scary at the time, but looking back it was one of the best decisions I ever made. The minute I dropped out I could stop taking the required classes that didn’t interest me, and begin dropping in on the ones that looked interesting.

“It wasn’t all romantic. I didn’t have a dorm room, so I slept on the floor in friends’ rooms, I returned coke bottles for the 5 cent deposits to buy food with, and I would walk the seven miles across town every Sunday night to get one good meal a week at the Hare Krishna temple. I loved it. And much of what I stumbled into by following my curiosity and intuition turned out to be priceless later on. Let me give you one example.

“Reed College at that time offered perhaps the best calligraphy instruction in the country. Throughout the campus every poster, every label on every drawer, was beautifully hand calligraphed. Because I had dropped out and didn’t have to take the normal classes, I decided to take a calligraphy class to learn how to do this. I learned about serif and san serif typefaces, about varying the amount of space between different letter combinations, about what makes great typography great. It was beautiful, historical, artistically subtle in a way that science can’t capture, and I found it fascinating.

“None of this had even a hope of any practical application in my life. But 10 years later, when we were designing the first Macintosh computer, it all came back to me. And we designed it all into the Mac. It was the first computer with beautiful typography. If I had never dropped in on that single course in college, the Mac would have never had multiple typefaces or proportionally spaced fonts. And since Windows just copied the Mac, it’s likely that no personal computer would have them. If I had never dropped out, I would have never dropped in on this calligraphy class, and personal computers might not have the wonderful typography that they do.”

At the end of the speech, his advice to the students went like this:

“Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life. Don’t be trapped by dogma — which is living with the results of other people’s thinking. Don’t let the noise of others’ opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary.

“When I was young, there was an amazing publication called “The Whole Earth Catalog, “which was one of the bibles of my generation. It was created by a fellow named Stewart Brand not far from here in Menlo Park, and he brought it to life with his poetic touch. This was in the late 1960’s, before personal computers and desktop publishing, so it was all made with typewriters, scissors, and Polaroid cameras. It was sort of like Google in paperback form, 35 years before Google came along: it was idealistic, and overflowing with neat tools and great notions.

“Stewart and his team put out several issues of The Whole Earth Catalog, and then when it had run its course, they put out a final issue. It was the mid-1970s, and I was your age. On the back cover of their final issue was a photograph of an early morning country road, the kind you might find yourself hitchhiking on if you were so adventurous. Beneath it were the words: “Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish.” It was their farewell message as they signed off. Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish.

“And I have always wished that for myself.

“And now, as you graduate to begin anew, I wish that for you.

“Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish.”

 

Finally he stopped breathing. but his remarkable steps are still with us. his inventions are telling  us  a story of a person who satisfied with his life.

Dearest Jobs….may you attain Nirvana …

 

Posted in People | Tagged , | Leave a comment